My daughter is in elementary school. Each morning we drive near the school, then walk the rest of the way. It’s a wonderful way to start our morning – a walk and talk on the way to school? It’s blissful.

This morning, though, the traffic was much worse than usual. As we turned left via our normal route, I noticed flashing lights ahead. We got closer and saw several police cars, a firetruck, and an ambulance blocking our usual parking lot. I quickly rerouted, found a place to park, bundled up my babies, and we walked to school.

Our walk slowed as we got closer to the school. There were so many flashing lights. The usual busy parking lot was nearly empty. I caught the eye of another mom who also parks in that parking lot.

“Good morning!” I said. I saw on her face a somber look. “Do you know what happened?”

She replied quietly. “A seventh grader. She got hit on her bike. In the crosswalk. The crossing guard was there too. But the car just didn’t stop.”

I was stunned. Everything was right – the crossing guard was doing her job. The student was following instructions. And still she was hurt.

It was a somber morning at the school.

I’m not sure the state of the student. I genuinely hope she’s ok. I’m praying for her.

One action. So many affected.

I’ve been thinking about how many people this one action affected… the student, her family, the crossing guard, the driver who hit the student, their family, all the paramedics and law enforcement who responded to the scene, all the students and teachers at the school…

I had a different post planned for today, but this was too important to skip over.

Please take care of your babies. And please take care of other’s babies too.

Please don’t numb out the world around you. And when accidents happen – because they surely do – please hold those around you even closer. Your family, your friends, and the strangers you pass. They’re all people. They’re all someone’s child. Please notice people.

We’re here to help lift each other.

So please – reach out to someone today. Anyone. Look them in their eyeballs, lean in, and listen to what they have to say. Let them know they belong.